Theory


Lord Krishna and the Amorality of  Wartime Tactical Decisions Theory

Reins in hand, Lord Krishna brought the chariot carrying Arjuna to the battlefield of Kurukshetra. Arjuna was uneasy and asked Lord Krishna to take the chariot to the centre of the battlefield from where he could see both the armies. Lord Krishna knew that before the epic clash began, he would have to fight his own battle against Arjuna’s very human vacillation, natural in such...

Read More


Lord Krishna and adherence to the Dharma Theory

Lord Krishna is very understandably not regarded as a normal human being, but he is also not regarded as a normal or ordinary God or just another incarnation of God. He is considered extraordinary in godliness and as the most complete incarnation of God possible, mythologically speaking. This is another reason why every intellectual inquiry into the rationality or morality of his actions is responded...

Read More


Lord Krishna and Jarasandha: Legitimacy of Annexation Theory

Attired as Brahmins, Lord Krishna, Bhima and Arjuna presented themselves before Jarasandha, who was not mislead by the dressing and could sense that the trio did not look like Brahmins in the least. When he expresses his doubt, Lord Krishna speaks thus: O king, know us for Snataka Brahmanas. Brahmanas and Kshatriyas and Vaishyas are all, O monarch, competent to observe the vow of Snataka....

Read More


Lord Krishna and Jarasandha: Self-preservation and War Theory

To understand the philosophy of Lord Krishna, it is imperative to have a close look at his life and what all he stood for. The first major political event in the life of Lord Krishna occurred when he killed his maternal uncle, Kansa. For slaying of Kansa there were many reasons, personal and political, both. Kansa was an unjust king who had begotten the throne...

Read More


Lord Ram and Lord Krishna: Different Lives, Different Purposes Theory

Lord Ram, the seventh incarnation of Lord Vishnu, is seen as the ideal man who lived a model life to earn the well-deserved epithet of Maryadapurushottam . Lord Ram’s life and the way Lord Krishna lived are markedly different and the reason for the difference in their ways is very educative in terms of the way societies evolve and how the law keeps pace with...

Read More


Lord Krishna: The Man and the God Theory

Lord Krishna is understood to be the eighth avatar of Lord Vishnu and is one of his two poornavtars , the other being Lord Ram. Lord Krishna’s life is spiritually, socially and politically quite instructive, and so are his ideas. Osho speaks of the uniqueness of Lord Krishna thus: The most important reason is that Krishna is the sole great man in our whole history who...

Read More


Vidur: Attributes and Conduct of the King Theory

In the political scheme of Vidur, the king is central, which is why he is insistent on the king’s inculcating all those characteristics that are required for him to be a powerful and widely respected monarch. Vidur is alive to the fact that it is through the regard of the masses that the king gains the moral ground from which all political legitimacy flows. However,...

Read More


Vidur’s Advice to the King Theory

Vidur’s interaction with Dhritrashtra appears to be a generalized discourse on human virtues. It would be a serious error if one were to consider Vidur, the Prime Minister of Hastinapur, naïve enough to indulge in high sounding talk that is of no use or relevance to a king. Vidur’s exposition of the principles of good policy and virtues is very much in the context of...

Read More


The Outlines of Vidur Niti Theory

Vidur was known for his wisdom, honesty and unwavering loyalty to the ancient Aryan kingdom of Hastinapur. He was the Prime Minister of Hastinapur and advised king Dhritrashtra and when Yudhishthir became the emperor after the great war of Mahabharata, Vidur helped him with the administration of the kingdom before accompanying Dhritrashtra, Gandhari and Kunti on their last journey to the forest. He was the...

Read More


Narad on War and Peace Theory

Justness of the King is central to the legitimacy of his rule because an unjust king would progressively lose the confidence of the people and his people would no longer be willing to stand by him in times of adversity. If the adverse sentiments and unfavourable popular opinion of the people are gauged by an enemy, he would not hesitate to attack such a kingdom,...

Read More



Page 1 of 3123